Tumors (neoplasia) in Dogs and Cats
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Malignant Lymphomas 
Neoplastic Disaese 
 
Perianal Adenoma
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Malignant Lymphomas
General Information:
Malignant lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system.  The disease may involve only certain blood cells, or it may arise in the lymph nodes (glands) or other lymphatic tissues, such as in the spleen, digestive tract or bone marrow.  The disease may remain in one lymph node or group of nodes, or spread to many other areas of the body.  The disease is progressive and fatal after a variable time.
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Chemotherapy combined with surgical removable of accessible tumors is the most effective treatment.  The goal of treatment is to control progression of the disease and extend life with as few undesirable side effects as possible.
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A complete physical examination, with blood tests and radiographs (x-rays), is necessary to properly plan treatment for your pet.  Various blood tests are necessary during chemotherapy to determine the effectiveness of treatment and monitor the development of any undesirable side effects.  Your petís activity will be regulated somewhat by its sense of well-being.  Do not allow your pet to exercise to the point of fatigue.
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Notify your veterinarian if any of the following occur:


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Neoplastic Disease
General Information:
Neoplasia means "new growth."  Such growths are referred to as tumors.  All tumors are not serious threats to health, and one of the objectives is to determine whether your petís tumor is malignant (cancerous) or benign (non-cancerous).
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Some of the causes of tumors are known, but much is not yet understood.  Some factors that cause tumors include viruses, parasites, irradiation (sunlight, x-rays), hormones, genetic predisposition, and some chemicals.
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Benign tumors do not spread to other parts of the body and are the less dangerous type.  Malignant tumors can spread and are much more dangerous.  Microscopic examination of a tissue sample (biopsy) can determine whether a tumor is malignant or benign.  Physical examination, radiographs (x-rays) and laboratory tests may be used to determine your petís condition before treatment.
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The earlier a tumor is diagnosed and treated, the less likely it will cause permanent harm.  The tumorís location and nature and your petís age and general health determine the type of treatment.  Surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy or a combination of these may be used.  Some forms of neoplasia require a considerable personal and economic commitment by the owner.  Your veterinarian will assist you in any way possible to arrive at a decision on how far to pursue treatment.  Your pet may be referred to a cancer specialist for further evaluation and/or treatment.
 

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Perianal Adenoma
General Information:
Perianal adenomas arise from the numerous small glands present in the anal area.  They are one of the most common tumors in male dogs over eight years of age.  Occasionally they develop in younger dogs.  Females are rarely affected.  Generally the tumor is an easily observable lump under the skin close to the anus or on the underside of the tail.  Multiple tumors may be present.  Raw, bleeding areas on these tumors are common.  Malignant growths that spread or grow progressively deeper occur occasionally.
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Surgical removal of the tumor is the best treatment.  Removal of the testicles (castration) at the same time is advised, since this may arrest tumor growth.  Female hormones are used when the tumor is inoperable and also as supplemental treatment after surgical removal.  Radiation treatment may be necessary in deep, widely spread or multiple inoperable growths.
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Notify your veterinarian if any of the following occur: